About Us

 

The economic crash has meant many things for many people, but for nearly all of us it has involved putting cherished dreams on hold.
As the years slide by, those postponed ambitions start to look like foolish notions, a far cry from the business of survival.
There are always plenty of reasons not to go away.
For each of us, a parent endured a long illness and died, children came along and needed rearing and the recession reared up to put the kybosh on our ambitions. Or so it seemed.
On the one hand, the arrival of our fourth child in 2013 seemed like a permanent end to any plans to travel. On the other, why not just bring the baby?
We cut our cloth according to our measure by abandoning thoughts of round-the-world travel. With four children in tow, we’re not the fastest-moving group on the road. And we had a four month old baby to consider.
Keen to expose the older children to a very different culture, language and environment, we settled on Central America, in particular Nicaragua and Costa Rica.
So here we are. The three girls are enjoying attending a local school here in Granada, Nicaragua, as well as keeping up with their Irish school work. They have adjusted to the heat and way of life in no time at all. And while this is a beautiful country, it’s also the second poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, with a troubled history to boot, so the children’s eyes are being opened not only to natural beauty, but also to the challenges faced by people living in poverty.
We’re learning some Spanish. The baby is lapping up the adoration he gets everywhere he goes.
Life’s a bit more stripped down here, so there’s plenty of time to do things as a family, enjoy the outdoors and shoot the breeze with new friends.
We’re discovering the difference between living somewhere and taking a holiday.

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5 Responses to About Us

  1. Colum Foley says:

    Hi Guys – what a great adventure! Happy New Year – Colum

  2. Esmeralda Green says:

    I just read your article in the Irish Times, great thanks. Have thought of going back to Costa Rica and Nicaragua with three kids, my husband and my mother for a while now. I’m a Nicaraguan married to an Irish man living in Ireland and Europe all my life. We we’re in Nicaragua 6-7 years ago. I remember the frequent power cuts in Granada, are they gone now? And did you have to have your own generator for when you had no electricity? Water pressure was also a problem, sometimes you couldn’t take a shower or flush the toilets in the good hotel we stayed in. Also what school did your children go to? Would love to find out how you found the house you rented. You are a very brave woman, glad to hear my fellow countrymen and women welcomed you and your family.

    • Hi Esmerelda,

      Thanks for your message. We experienced very few power cuts in Granada when we were there. In one place we rented, there were backup generators. Water pressure was ok; usually ok for a shower, though not always a hot one. Toilets mainly didn’t accept paper, though flushing wasn’t a problem. Our children went to Sacuanjoche International School, located just outside Granada, which was most welcoming. We found our Granada house rentals through GPS property services, who were efficient and reliable. We were completely taken with your country and countrymen and women. Happy to answer any further questions you have. Good luck with your plans.

  3. Hi Deirdre,
    I remember you from the Ursuline ( you were years ahead of me!!!!!!) fantastic story. Beautiful family. Keep up the good work.
    Best wishes,
    Yvonne Cole

    Follow my blog
    http://www.coledupuisphotography.blogspot.com

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